Facts about Penguins

  • Some species live in very cold regions and others live in very warm areas.
  • No species of the penguin is able to fly. They are classified as birds though.
  • They use their tail and flippers to help them stay balanced when they aren’t in the water.
  • Penguins are fast and agile swimmers.
  • While on land penguins may waddle, hop, jump, or slide on their belly. This range of movement helps them to get through snow and rocky terrain with ease.
  • Hearing is a key sense for penguins. It is the primary way that parents and young can communicate and find each other with ease in a large colony.
  • Penguins are able to see well both on land and in the water.
  • There are layers of thick features on their body to offer them insulation both when they are in the water and when they are on land.Facts About Penguins
  • It is possible for penguins to drink salt water without any problems. Their nasal passages offer a means for any excess salt to be removed from the body.
  • There are four toes found on each foot. They feature webbed feet.
  • The Emperor Penguin is the largest of all species. It weighs from 60 to 90 pounds and can be up to 3 feet 7 inches tall.
  • The Fairy Penguin is the smallest species. It weighs just over 2 pounds and is only 16 inches tall!
  • Penguins consume krill, crustaceans, squid, and fish. They swallow them whole and rely on rear facing spines to direct the food down the esophagus.
  • The penguin features more feathers on its body than any other bird.
  • The process of shedding feathers takes place at least once a year. This allows them to have feathers that are clean, secure, and contain enough oil.
  • Penguins fast during the molting process and remain on land instead of in the water. They survive on the layers of fat they have stored up.
  • They are recognized as being the most social of all species of birds.
  • Preening is a necessary task for penguins to help distribute oil all over their features. The oil comes from a gland in the tail. They use the bill to get it and to rub it on all their feathers. They may be seen twisting and turning to accomplish this task.
  • Many species of penguins select one mate for life.
  • The females of the colony often help to take care of the  young chicks collectively.
  • Males help to keep the eggs warm and safe until it is time for the young to emerge. They also help with rearing and with feeding the young.
  • Conservation efforts including securing beach areas where the colonies live and lay their eggs.

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  • Pollution is a huge problem in the water for penguins, and efforts to keep chemicals, trash, and other debris out of them is very important.
  • The young chicks have juvenile feathers and they rely on their parents to bring them food. Once their adult plumage comes in, they have to find their own food sources.
  • There are 17 species of penguins. 3 species of penguins are considered to be endangered. 12 species are considered to be threatened due to dropping numbers.
  • They have a very diverse distribution that allows them to find enough food and to also have land sections they can reach.
  • Penguins can spend from ¼ to ¾ of their life in the water. It depends on the specific species.
  • In some cultures, adult penguins are killed and boiled so that the oil can be extracted from their bodies.